Impact of glazing type and orientation on the optimum dimension of windows for office room in hot climate

Chahrazed Mebarki (Laboratory built in the environment, University of science and technology Houari Boumediene, 16111 Bab Ezzouar, Algiers, Algeria)
Essaid Djakab (Laboratory built in the environment, University of science and technology Houari Boumediene, 16111 Bab Ezzouar, Algiers, Algeria)
Sidi Mouhamed Karim El Hassar (Laboratory built in the environment, University of science and technology Houari Boumediene, 16111 Bab Ezzouar, Algiers, Algeria)
Mohamed El-Amine Slimani (University of Science and Technology Houari Boumediene (USTHB))

Article ID: 271

Abstract


This study aims to show the impact of orientation and glazing type on optimum window size in hot climate using genetic algorithms. In winter the optimization of window size is obtained thanks to thermal gains from solar radiation, taking into account this free heat gains from the sun reduces heating demand of the building. In summer the optimization of window size is complex, in this case, the window is considered as a heat gains element. For a hot climate, the sun can be used as a passive strategy to reduce energy consumption. An optimal window size allows avoiding problems of glare and overheating. ASHRAE proposed a Window to Wall Ratio (WWR) which is considered as the optimal window size that ensures minimum annual thermal loads, this coefficient neglect different parameters such as (Glazing type, the orientation, daytime). A typical office room located in Ghardaia (South of Algeria) is selected as a case study. The results show that daylight is a key factor in limiting the window size in hot climate. The WWR cannot be considered as optimal for the whole year; this study shows that the optimal window size varies with daytime.


Keywords


Energy consumption; Window size; Optimization; Daylight; Hot climate; Cooling loads

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.30564/jaeser.v1i1.271

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Copyright © 2018 Chahrazed Mebarki, Essaid Djakab, Sidi Mouhamed Karim El Hassar, Mohamed El-Amine Slimani


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