Observation of the Effect of Gait-induced Functional Electrical Stimulation on Stroke Patients with Foot Drop

Anqi Zhang (Zhengzhou Central Hospital Affiliated to Zhengzhou University)
Mengjiao Wu (Zhengzhou Central Hospital Affiliated to Zhengzhou University)
Luxi Mao (Zhengzhou Central Hospital Affiliated to Zhengzhou University)
Qianhuan Zhang (Zhengzhou Central Hospital Affiliated to Zhengzhou University)
Bingqian Zhou (Zhengzhou Central Hospital Affiliated to Zhengzhou University)
Jingxin Wang (Zhengzhou Central Hospital Affiliated to Zhengzhou University)

Article ID: 3688

DOI: https://doi.org/10.30564/jams.v5i1.3688

Abstract


Objective: To explore the effects of functional electrical stimulation and functional mid frequency electrical stimulation on lower limb function and balance function in stroke patients. Methods: 20 cases of stroke patients with foot drop after admission were randomly divided into the observation group and the control group, 10 cases in each group. On the basis of the two groups of patients, the observation group used the gait induced functional electrical stimulation to stimulate the peroneal nerve and the pretibial muscle in the observation group. The control group used the computer medium frequency functional electrical stimulation to stimulate the peroneal nerve and the anterior tibial muscle for 2 weeks. Before and after treatment, the lower extremity simple Fugl-Meyer scale (FMA), the Berg balance scale (BBS) and the improved Ashworth scale were evaluated respectively, and the comparative analysis was carried out in the group and between the groups. Results: After 2 weeks of treatment, the scores of FMA and BBS in the two groups were significantly higher than those before the treatment (P < 0.05), and the scores of FMA and BBS in the observation group were higher than those in the control group (P < 0.05), and the flexor muscle tension of the ankle plantar flexor muscle of the observed group was lower than that of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Exercise therapy combined with gait induced functional electrical stimulation or computer intermediate frequency functional electrical stimulation can significantly improve lower limb function and balance function in patients with ptosis, and the therapeutic effect of functional electrical stimulation combined with gait is better. 


Keywords


Stroke; Foot drop; Functional electrical stimulation; Lower limb function; Balance functio

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References


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Copyright © 2022 Anqi Zhang, Jingxin Wang, Mengjiao Wu, Luxi Mao, Qianhuan Zhang, Bingqian Zhou


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