Aspects of Impacts of Proposed Badagry Deep Sea Port on the Ecosystem and Livelihood of Fishing Communities in Badagry, Lagos State, Nigeria

Martins A. Anetekhai (Department of Fisheries, Lagos State University, Lagos, Nigeria)
Martins A. Anetekhai (Department of Fisheries, Lagos State University, Lagos, Nigeria)
Toki Peter (Department of Fisheries, Lagos State University, Lagos, Nigeria)
Toki Peter (Department of Fisheries, Lagos State University, Lagos, Nigeria)
Gabriel Olarinde Mekuleyi (Department of Fisheries, Lagos State University, Lagos, Nigeria)
Oluwayemisi A. Osodein (Department of Fisheries, Lagos State University, Lagos, Nigeria)
Oluwayemisi A. Osodein (Department of Fisheries, Lagos State University, Lagos, Nigeria)

Article ID: 4414

DOI: https://doi.org/10.30564/jfsr.v4i2.4414

Abstract


Federal government of Nigeria, in collaboration with Lagos StateGovernment proposed development of a seaport in Badagry. This researchexamined and documented the current state of the ecosystem and livelihoodof thirteen communities that will be impacted by the proposed deep-seaport. Qualitative and quantitative approaches were used for the study.Review of secondary data was used to investigate the demographic dataof the community while Participatory Rural Appraisal was conducted for300 households in the communities. Majority of the sampled respondentswere in the age range of 45 years and above with females (60%) more thanmales (40%) in the entire population sampled. Educational levels of therespondents are relatively low. The majority of the sampled householdshave multiple livelihood systems that keep them engaged throughout allseasons of the year. Capture fisheries is the major occupation in the studyarea and it is complemented with aquaculture. Existing groups are notstrong enough to operate as a pressure group to influence policies andregulate market prices, which has been identified as a major limitation inthe study area. There was no regular training or capacity building. Hencethe groups were not operating as a business enterprise and could not expandor increase capacity. Consequently not able to contribute significantlyto poverty alleviation and increase employment opportunities in theirlocalities. This document will serve as one of the guides to the governmentfor decision-making and compensation to the communities.

Keywords


Seaport; Livelihood; Communities; Badagry; Decision making

Full Text:

PDF

References


[1] Hodder, B.W., 1962. Badagry 1:Slave Port and Mission Center in Nigeria. Geographical Journal. 5(2), 75-86.

[2] Simpson, A., 1994. Badagry: The Religious function of Agbalata Market. G.O. Ogunremi, M.O. Opeloye and Suju Oyrweso editors-Badagry: A study on history, culture and tradition of Ancient city.Ibadan Rex. Publication, pp. 305-313.

[3] Simpson, A., 2004. Oral Tradition and Slave Trade in Nigeria,Ghana and Bennin,Paris:United Nation Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization.

[4] Zann, L.P., 1995. Our sea, our future: major findings of the State of the Environment Report for Australia. Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, Ocean Rescue 2000, Department of the Environment, Sport and Territories, Canberra.

[5] Edgar, G.J., Barrett, N.S., Graddon, D.J., 1999. A classification of Tasmanian estuaries and assessment of their conservation significance using ecological and physical attributes, population and land use.Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute, University of Tasmania, Technical Report No. 2.

[6] Coleman, N., Parry, G.D., Cogen, B.F., et al., 1999.Port Phillip Bay: biology, habitats and disturbance history. Hewitt, C.L., Campbell, M.L., Thresher, R.E. and Martin, R.B. (eds.) Marine biological invasions of Port Phillip Bay, Victoria. Centre for Research on Introduced Marine Pests. Technical Report No.20. CSIRO Marine Research, Hobart.

[7] Hewitt, C.L., Campbell, M.L., Thresher, R.E.,et al.,1999. Marine biological invasions of Port Phillip Bay, Victoria. Centre for Research on Introduced Marine Pests. Technical Report No. 20. CSIRO Marine Research, Hobart.

[8] Winstanley, R., 1995. Issues in the Victorian marine environment. Zann, L.P. (ed.) Our sea, our future: major findings of the State of the Environment Report for Australia, Technical Annex 3: State and Territory Issues. Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, Ocean Rescue 2000, Department of the Environment, Sport and Territories, Canberra.

[9] Mekuleyi, G.O., Anetekhai, M.A., Aderinola, O.J.,et al., 2019.Environmental Health Status of Some Aquatic Ecosystems in Badagry Division of Lagos State, Southwest, Nigeria. International Journal of Ecotoxicology and Ecobiology. 4(4), 93-102.

[10] Yamane, T., 1967. Statistics: An Introductory Analysis, 2nd Ed., New York: Harper and Row.

[11] Nathan, A., Nathan, J.B., Philippe, L.B., et al., 2021. Oil, fisheries and coastal communities: A review of impacts on the environment, livelihoods, space and governance. Energy Research and Social Science. 75, 1-15.

[12] Victor, A.A., 2014.A Framework for Determining the Compensable Value of Damages Due to Contamination to Wetlands in the Niger Delta of Nigeria.A Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Award of the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy of the University of Salford, School of the Built Environment, pp. 1-367.

[13] IFRC, 2010. Guidelines for livelihoods programming.A report prepared by International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Geneva.

[14] World Bank,1988. Resettlement in Development Projects, World Bank Technical Paper No. 80, Annex 1 (Washington, D.C, U.S.A.).


Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.
Copyright © 2022 Gabriel Olarinde Mekuleyi


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.