Relationship between D90 and D100 with Biochemical and Local Failure in Low-risk Prostate Cancer Treated with Low-rate Brachytherapy (LDR)

Marta Dominguez Morcillo (Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Central de la Defensa, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain)
Carmen Ibáñez Villoslada (Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Central de la Defensa, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain)
Joaquín Navarro Castellón (Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Central de la Defensa, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain)
Paula Sáez Bueno (Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Central de la Defensa, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain)
Eliseo Carrasco Esteban (Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Central de la Defensa, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain)
Andrea Matas Escamillas (Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Central de la Defensa, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain)
Zigor Zalabarría Zarrabeitia (Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Central de la Defensa, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain)
María Concepción López Carrizosa (Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Central de la Defensa, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain)

Article ID: 4721

DOI: https://doi.org/10.30564/jor.v4i2.4721

Abstract


Low dose rate brachytherapy (LDR) is an accepted, effective treatment with few local side effects, used as monotherapy in patients with low-risk prostate cancer (PC). The aim of this paper is to analyse 245 patients treated with LDR in the Radiation Oncology Department of the Hospital Gómez Ulla, from 2004 to 2016, evaluating the relationship of dosimetric parameters with biochemical and local recurrence as well as genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity derived from the technique. The results obtained show a clear relationship between the dose used and biochemical and local failure.


Keywords


Brachytherapy; Prostate; Cancer; Dose; Failure; Biochemical; Local

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References


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