Effectiveness of Behavioral Intervention among Congenital Heart Defect Children

Mridula C Jobson (Christ Academy Institute for Advanced Studies, Bengaluru, India)

Article ID: 3022

DOI: https://doi.org/10.30564/jpr.v3i2.3022

Abstract


Development in medical intervention has significantly decreased the mortality rates for children with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) but among these survivors with complex heart disease there occurs a unique pattern of neuro-developmental and neuropsychology impairment characterized social interaction impairment, impulsive Behavior, and impaired executive functions. Presence of behavioral problem is found significantly high in pediatric population with chronic illness than children with absence of chronic illness. The sample of 200 children with congenital heart defect was selected between age 4-8 years using multistage stratified sampling. The childhood psychopathology measurement schedule (CPMS) by Dr. Savitha Malhotra was used for assessing Behavioral problems present in children with CHD. “Pre- Post experimental design was used to investigate the study and the results were statistically analyzed using paired T test. The result revealed that the effectiveness of intervention program to retrain Behavior showed high significance. With increased survival rates, the aim of the intervention and research based on clinical practices gets a shift from short term medical assessment to long term assessment and intervention of morbidity


Keywords


Congenital heart defect;Neuro-psychological retraining;Neurodevelopment;Behavioral and emotional retraining

Full Text:

PDF

References


[1] Karsdorp PA, Everaerd W, Kindt M, Mulder BJ. Psychological and cognitive functioning in children and adolescents with congenital heart disease: a meta-analysis. J Pediatr Psychol. 2007 Jun;32(5):527- 41. DOI: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsl047. Epub 2006 Dec 20. PMID: 17182669.

[2] Forbess, J. M., Visconti, K. J., Hancock-Friesen, C., Howe, R. C., Bellinger, D. C., & Jonas, R. A. (2002). Neurodevelopmental outcome after congenital heart surgery: results from an institutional registry. Circulation, 106 (13 suppl).

[3] Bhardwaj, R., Rai, S. K., Yadav, A. K., Lakhotia, S., Agrawal, D., Kumar, A., & Mohapatra, B. (2015). Epidemiology of Congenital Heart Disease in India. Congenital heart disease, 10(5), 437-446.

[4] Nattel SN, Adrianzen L, Kessler EC, Andelfinger G, Dehaes M, Côté-Corriveau G, Trelles MP. Congenital Heart Disease and Neurodevelopment: Clinical Manifestations, Genetics, Mechanisms, and Implications. Can J Cardiol. 2017 Dec;33(12):1543-1555. DOI: 10.1016/j.cjca.2017.09.020. Epub 2017 Oct 6. PMID: 29173597.

[5] Saxena A. Congenital Heart Disease in India: A Status Report. Indian Pediatr. 2018 Dec 15;55(12):1075- 1082. PMID: 30745481.

[6] McClaskey, B. (2010). The Impact of Chronic Illness on School-aged Children. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 24(5), e5-e6.

[7] Karsdorp PA, Everaerd W, Kindt M, Mulder BJ. Psychological and cognitive functioning in children and adolescents with congenital heart disease: a meta-analysis. J Pediatr Psychol. 2007 Jun;32(5):527- 41. DOI: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsl047. Epub 2006 Dec 20. PMID: 17182669.

[8] Morton, P. D., Ishibashi, N., & Jonas, R. A. (2017). Neurodevelopmental Abnormalities and Congenital Heart Disease: Insights Into Altered Brain Maturation. Circulation research, 120(6), 960-977. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.309048.

[9] Johnson, B. (2015). Behavior Problems in Children with Congenital Heart Disease. BMH Medical Journal - ISSN 2348–392X, 2(1), 14-19.

[10] Fredriksen PM, Mengshoel AM, Frydenlund A, Sorbye O, Thaulow E. Follow-up in patients with congenital cardiac disease more complex than haemodynamic assessment. Cardiol Young.2004;14:373-9.

[11] Hovels-Gurich HH, Konrad K, Wiesner M, Minkenberg R, Herpertz-Dahlmann B, Messmer BJ, Von Bernuth G. Long term Behavioraloutcome after neonatal arterial switch operation fortransposition of the great arteries. Arch Dis Child. 2002;87:506-10.

[12] Janus M., Goldberg S. Sibling empathy and Behavioraladjustment of children with chronicillness. Child Care Health Dev. 1995; 21, 321 -31.

[13] Utens EM, Verhulst FC, Meijboom FJ, Duivenvoorden HJ, Erdman RA, Bos E, Roelandt JT,Hess J. Behavioraland emotional problems in children and adolescents with congenital heartdisease. Psychol Med. 1993;23:415-24.

[14] Haseba, S., Sakakima, H., Nakao, S., Ohira, M., Yanagi, S., Imoto, Y.& Shimodozono, M. (2018). Early postoperative physical therapy for improving shortterm gross motor outcome in infants with cyanotic and acyanotic congenital heart disease. Disability and rehabilitation, 40(14), 1694-1701.

[15] Ben-Itzchak, E., & Zachor, D. A. (2007). The effects of intellectual functioning and autism severity on outcome of early Behavioralintervention for children with autism. Research in developmental disabilities, 28(3), 287-303.


Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.
Copyright © 2021 Mridula C Jobson


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.