Molecular Analysis of Pathogenicity Differences of Avian Paramyxovirus 1 Genotypes VI and VII in Chickens

Yang Song (Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology of the Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, People’s Republic of China)
Jing Zhao (Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology of the Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, People’s Republic of China)
Huiming Yang (Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology of the Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, People’s Republic of China)
Yawen Bu (Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology of the Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, People’s Republic of China)
Guozhong Zhang (Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology of the Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, People’s Republic of China)

Abstract


Background: Genotypes VI and VII of  (APMV-1) have different host range and pathogenicity in pigeons and chickens. However, the molecular determinants of these differences are still unclear. Methods: Here, we aligned the DNA sequences of 56 genotype VI and 33 genotype VII APMV-1 strains. Sequence alignment results revealed that there are 17 amino acids sites differed between APMV-1 strains of these two genotypes. We then constructed a plasmid based on the full-length genome of rSG10 APMV-1 strain, which belongs to genotype VII but was mutated with these 17 VI-genotype-specific amino acids, and rescued as rSG10-17 strain. The restriction digestion and ligation and overlapping PCR methods were used in the construction of plasmids with amino acids mutation. This virus was evaluated for its virulence and growth characteristics. Results and conclusion: The results indicated that the virulence and the growth characteristics have no obvious difference between the rSG10-17 virus and its parental strain rSG10. The simultaneous mutation of 17 genotype-specific amino acids did not affect the virulence of APMV-1 in chickens. Further analysis of these amino acids is required by taking into consideration of the functions of encoded proteins.


Keywords


Avian avulavirus-1; Genotype; Pathogenicity; Chicken; Molecular determinant

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.30564/vsr.v1i1.879

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